"Green" Resources
None

1973 : Sorry, Out of Gas

NoneGo to site >
1973 : Sorry, Out of Gas

Category:

Exhibitions

Featuring over 350 objects including architectural drawings, photographs, books and pamphlets, archival television footage, and historical artifacts, the exhibition 1973: Sorry, Out of Gas mapped the architectural response to the energy crisis and its relevance today.

Open in a new window >
None

Environmental Challenges and Urban Solutions

NoneGo to site >
Environmental Challenges and Urban Solutions

Institution:

Princeton University,

Category:

Syllabi

Environmental Challenges and Urban Solutions confronts urbanization and environmental problems, rethinking traditional theories about nature and city dynamics. 

Open in a new window >
None

Food and the City: Histories of Culture and Cultivation

NoneGo to site >
Food and the City: Histories of Culture and Cultivation

Institution:

Dumbarton Oaks,

Category:

Publications

Locations:

Global,

Food and the City explores the physical, social, and political relations between the production of food and urban settlements. Edited by Dorothée Imbert, its thirteen essays discuss the multiple scales and ideologies of productive landscapes--from market gardens in sixteenth-century Paris to polder planning near mid-twentieth century Amsterdam to opportunistic agriculture in today's Global South--and underscore the symbiotic connection between productive landscape and urban form across times and geographies.

Open in a new window >
None

Frontiers in Urban Landscape Research

NoneGo to site >
Frontiers in Urban Landscape Research

Institution:

Dumbarton Oaks,

Locations:

Washington, DC,

Doctoral candidates in advanced stages of writing dissertations on topics in the history and design of urban landscapes were invited to share selected aspects of their work with each other and with senior designers and scholars in the field.

Open in a new window >
None

Harvard-Dumbarton Oaks Semester-Long Fellowships

NoneGo to site >
Harvard-Dumbarton Oaks Semester-Long Fellowships

Institution:

Dumbarton Oaks,

Category:

Funding

Locations:

Washington, DC,

Dumbarton Oaks, affiliated with the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences, is one of the few institutions in the world with a program devoted to garden and landscape studies that is targeted at both humanities scholars and landscape practitioners. The Mellon Fellowships are intended to expand significantly the opportunities for both of these groups, building constructive dialogue between them about the history and future of urban landscapes.

Open in a new window >
None

Keywords for the Environment

NoneGo to site >
Keywords for the Environment

Category:

Other

The Toolkit for Today program at the CCA invites scholars to open up their toolboxes and share the methods and concepts with which they work on contemporary issues in architecture and related disciplines. In 2016, the Toolkit for Today focused on “Keywords for the Environment,” with Ashley Dawson speaking on Resilience, Reinhold Martin on Power Rafico Ruiz on the North, and Jane Hutton on Materials.

Open in a new window >
None

New York Botanical Garden Fellowships

NoneGo to site >
New York Botanical Garden Fellowships

Category:

Funding

Locations:

New York,

The Humanities Institute, a division of  the New York Botanical Garden's LuEsther T. Mertz Library, offers two Mellon Fellowships for graduate students and post-doctoral researchers.

Open in a new window >
None

River Cities: Historical and Contemporary

NoneGo to site >
River Cities: Historical and Contemporary

Institution:

Dumbarton Oaks,

Locations:

Washington, DC,

This workshop builds dialogue between designers and scholars to address the landscape consequences of advancing urbanization

Open in a new window >
None

The Changing Nature of Nature in Cities

NoneGo to site >
The Changing Nature of Nature in Cities

Locations:

New York,

This symposium explored the concept of novel ecosystems that are the result of urban development, and asked if these much-maligned accidents of unbridled growth could ultimately mitigate the impacts of environmental change and re-introduce the wonder of nature in cities.

Open in a new window >